Observations: Eye contact with Dr. Sample by table

Tuesday March 31

Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8
1:45 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1
1:50 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0
1:55 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 2
2:00 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 0
2:05 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 0
2:10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2:15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2:20 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2:25 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
2:30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2:40 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2:45 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2:50 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 5 5 5 6 3 1 2 4

 

Thursday April 1

Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8
1:45 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
1:50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1:55 2 0 3 0 3 1 0 0
2:00 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0
2:05 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
2:10 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1
2:15 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
2:20 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0
2:25 3 2 2 1 1 2 3 4
2:30 1 1 2 0 2 0 0 0
2:40 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2:45 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2:50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 8 7 8 3 7 4 7 6

For my observations I separated the tables into groups and measured how many students at each table were making eye contact with Dr. Sample at 5 minute intervals. The Table Guide shows what number correlates to each table in the classroom. The purpose of these observations was to measure attentiveness to Dr. Sample and the lecture. I should have recorded more intervals if I wanted to get a true reading on which table pays the most attention to Dr. Sample because recording every five minutes does not provide enough data. In addition this is a flawed methodology because I am measuring attentiveness based on eye contact, so this method assumes that if you aren’t making eye contact than you are not paying attention to the lecture, which isn’t necessarily true. From the observations, I can’t reach any substantial conclusions on which table focused the most and least on the lectures of March 31 and April 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Self in the Quantified Self Movement

fitbit_flex_activity_monitor_3a

 

Anne Helen Peterson in her piece titled Big Mother is Watching You discusses the current and future implications of self-tracking wearables on our daily lives. By 2018 with over 60 million fitness trackers in use worldwide we will see the explosion of self-tracking devices. With the release of the Apple Watch we can see how self-tracking devices are transitioning into our mainstream day to day culture.. But, how will self-tracking change the way we live our lives? While self-tracking will empower individuals to improve their health and to discover things such as eczema inducers, self-tracking will also peel back the mystery of the human body. We will be able to quantify information that before was merely qualitative. For instance, instead of having the qualitative feeling that you had a good nights sleep we will be reliant on data from an app which will quantify the quality of our sleep based on our movements and breathing patterns. In a way this is excites me, but more often than not when I ponder these implications I feel as if this will undermine the importance of human emotion and feeling. Instead of deciding what feels best to us as individuals we will be reliant on what an app says is ideal for us. This reminds me of a current trend in medicine, which is the transition towards personalized medicine. In my opinion only when Quantified data is matched with our qualitative human emotions will I feel satisfied by the conclusions of self-tracking devices. If we allow it, self-tracking could easily strip us of our individuality and will undermine and doubt our own feelings about our bodies.

 

 

Observations

Tuesday:

15 open computers on desks

1 hat

3 girls no hats or headbands

Moved multiple times during class

Forced participation

Thursday:

25 open computers on desks

3 hats

3 girls 2 headbands no hats

Stationary during class except to get fit bits

R65 Skype call

0 people making eye contact with R65 camera

Voluntary participation

Beginning to See

6a00d8341c767353ef017d3be34453970c-320wi

 

James Hemings was lost for the past 200 years. James represents the many who were easily left out of textbooks. As a slave and cook to Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States, James had been forgotten. Even in “The Papers of Thomas Jefferson” database which has over 25,000 entries, one could perform a search for James Heming and find no results. What allowed us to find James is advanced computational linguistics and data visualization. Through these techniques we can begin to peel back the mystery of James Heming and to discover him through the writings of Thomas Jefferson. These techniques allows historians to build profiles on indiviuals who left little to no evidence of their existence. Like dark matter we now know these individuals existed, but all we really have is a ghost of their existence.

What I find most interesting about these techniques is the fact that you can build a profile about an individual based on someone else’s paper trail. I find this intriguing because our profiles are created by our paper trails, but per say what if one never used the internet or left a paper trail. could we use say our parents, our siblings, our best bestfriends data and paper trails to create profiles about these modern day ghosts? Lauren Klein’s piece truly shows the power of data technology and how transparent our identities are in this modern world.