Lab 3: Countering Examples of Popular GIFs

“an intervention into the practice of making GIFs”

Fandom

Example:

Counter-Example:

Fandom GIFs are used to highlight a specific scene from a particular show or movie and generally are either an important scene or have some sort of underlying emotion that conveys importance. An example of this is a scene from Bee Movie where Barry the bee is running into a window. This scene comes as he is first wandering around the world. My counter to this type of GIF is the entire movie. It’s sped up, so you aren’t sitting for 2 hours watching it, but it in turn doesn’t highlight a particular scene. This is, of course, an exaggeration of the idea of clipping your favorite scene from a movie — because in this case nothing is left out.

Cinemagraph

Example:

Counter-Example:

Cinemagraph GIFs are really cool. They are GIFs in which only one element of the image is moving. It let’s the creator highlight a certain part of the image. In this case, the bubbles being blown across the screen. In my counter example, however, there is no movement. I assure you, it is a GIF — and I did start with the same photo. But it only has one frame so there is no perceived motion. You are almost expecting the bubbles to move along the screen, but they don’t. They complete absence of the motion in the image takes it away from its use as a cinemagraph, but as it still stems from the original you’re almost anticipating the cinemagraphic motion. This is, like my counter-fandom example, an exaggeration: of the restriction of motion in a GIF (because in this case there is no motion).

Reaction

Example:

Counter-Example:

Reaction GIFs are images in which the action triggers some sort of reaction from the viewer — or, really, a GIF in which the subject of the image is offering an emotion or reaction. Typically reaction GIFs are used in quick conversations when words would take to long to explain your emotions. I chose a sloth from the movie Zootopia showing happiness or surprise for something that is happening. For my counter example of the GIF I added a few effects to it. First, I started by reversing the action in the image, to hopefully give the opposite reaction of the GIF. Which worked, the sloth now looks like it is going from happy to content… but I wanted to frustrate the viewer even more so I slowed the speed of the GIF down considerably. I mean, you sit there so long waiting for the reaction and it never really comes. This takes the GIF away from it’s usage as a quick reaction — and I don’t see this fitting much in conversations where GIFs replace words, because explaining the reaction in text would go much faster than this GIF.

Posted from DIG101 by Tucker C.

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